Brazil: Time to Trade in South America


President Obama did the right thing by leading a mission to Brazil for the purpose of improving U.S. trade in South America.

Brazil and the U.S. need to become stronger trading partners.  Brazil has much to offer in terms of natural resources. It is physically the largest South American state. Its width can be pictured by considering the fact that the Trans-Amazon Highway runs 3,400 miles from the Atlantic, in the east, to Peru, in the west. Brazil, with 200 million people, also has a large population. Its customer base is second in the Americas, only to the U.S.

Many Americans still harbor images of Brazil as a military dictatorship. Military juntas ruled from 1930 through 1954 and again from 1964 through 1985. They set aside constitutional law and dissolved political parties. They heard civilian cases in military courts. They denied individual rights. Political prisoners were subjected to torture and death squads.

But the days of military rule are gone. During the Jimmy Carter presidency, Human Rights became an issue worldwide. Brazil implemented reforms in 1979, and ended military rule in 1985, as the people voted again for the first time in decades. Brazil recently acknowledged their history of human rights abuse and moved on. Last year, they elected their first female president. Internationally, they have served on the Security Council 10 times since WWII. If the UN Charter were being drafted today, they certainly would be in line for a permanent seat.

Brazil is now a leading global economy. They joined the World Trade Organization 16 years ago. They are an industrial state that produces cement, steel, iron and vehicles. They are no longer limited to just coffee, corn and rice. 89% of their people are now literate. They host 33% of the top 100 Latin American colleges. Their scientists set off a controlled nuclear chain reaction, 54 years ago already. They launched a rocket into space in 2004.

The U.S. will never again have the preferred trading status it enjoyed during the 25 years following WWII, when Europe and East Asia were flat on their backs. It is a competitive world now and the U.S. must improve trade relations with other nations and particularly with developing states like Brazil.

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