Mexicans Need Jobs, Not Drug Wars


Another 13 dead bodies were found in the State of Tamaulipas, south of Texas along the Gulf of Mexico, and it appears the drug war in Mexico will not be over with any time soon.

Some say it is simple supply and demand and that as long as there is a demand for drugs in the U.S., people will continue to get involved in Mexico on the supply side.

Another explanation is that there are so few good paying jobs in Mexico that the business of selling drugs is one of the only ways for Mexicans to make any money.

Mexico, with a large population of 112 million, has significant economic troubles. Beginning in the 1960s, tourism increased in Cancun, Puerto Vallarta and at other historical sites, but that industry alone could not, and cannot, support Mexico’s economy.

There was hope that reducing barriers to trade would lift Mexico into a more prosperous future, as Mexico and the U.S. signed the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) (1994) and joined the World Trade Organization (1995), but half of the Mexican work force remains under-employed, and a large number continue to seek jobs in the U.S.

Mexicans have looked for work in the drug trade, because there are few opportunities elsewhere. Conducting a war on drugs without offering alternate employment has not worked and will not work. The war on drugs has been going on a long time. It started when President Nixon first tried to intercept the flow of marijuana from Mexico in 1969, but it did not work. The current phase of the 42-year-old drug war began when Mexican President Calderon took office (2006), but his efforts also will not succeed, since they are not addressing the economic causes of the problem.

When typical Mexican workers begin to have good paying jobs and something better to do than run drugs across the border, the practice of producing and selling them will fade from the scene. The Mexican government should focus on doing something positive, like creating jobs, and when they accomplish that goal, poor young Mexican men may no longer be tempted to turn to drugs as a vocation.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s