Debates Are Useful Campaign Tools


The Republican presidential hopefuls conducted 20 so-called “debates,” during a 10-month period, from May 2011 through March 2012, at which conservative audiences were treated to right-wing presentations as to economic, social, and foreign policy. They were usually staged in early primary states, as they held 3 in Iowa, 4 in New Hampshire, 4 in South Carolina, 4 in Florida, and 1 each in Nevada, Michigan, Arizona, Calf, and Wash. DC.

While some complained the 20 events were not really “debates,” but rather forums, where candidates simply said whatever they wanted on various topics, they were nonetheless much better than any other form of campaigning, such as TV ads, which tend to deceive, and provide very little in terms of honest information.

A formal debate begins with a “resolution” which affirmatively states an idea, such as: “U.S. Senators should be limited to no more than three terms, of six years each.” Two or perhaps three on each side of the issue then alternate presenting affirmative and negative positions, followed by rebuttals, each limited by time. The questions raised are answered by facts presented by each side.

In recent times, formal debates have not been a part of American politics, but they certainly could gain followers, if they were aired on Cable TV. There is a hunger in America, not for more talking heads of the sort found on the Fox Propaganda Network, but for well-reasoned and researched arguments, based on facts, so all of us can collectively reach a consensus on public policy questions.

Since no Democratic counterpoint was presented during the 20 GOP debates, there were times when it was very difficult to listen, but the Republicans nevertheless did the right thing by hosting them, so we could at least try to understand right-wing thinking.

Since the debates remain the best way to obtain unfiltered views as to the candidates, they continue to be a useful campaign tool.

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