Posts tagged ‘Marines’

03/22/2012

Marine Bases in U.S. Could Close

Do we really need so many Marine Corps bases? All of them in the U.S. are listed below with the hope you become exhausted reading through them. If we want to balance the federal budget, we have to cut waste by eliminating duplicitous military installations. Take your pick as to those we really need.

HAWAII: The Island of Oahu hosts Marine Corps Base-Hawaii in Honolulu, Camp H. M. Smith, and an Air Station at Kaneohe Bay.

CALIFORNIA: Camp Pendleton, a major training base, is in San Diego County, along with the Marine Corps Recruit Depot. Also in San Diego are redundant Air Stations at Camp Pendleton, and at Miramar. The 29 Palms Air Ground Combat Center, and the Barstow Marine Logistics Base, are in San Bernardino County, just east of Los Angeles. A Marine Aviation Detachment is at China Lake, further north in the Mojave Desert. Aviation Training Support Group 23 is based in the center of the state, at Lemoore. A Marine Corps Detachment is at the Defense Language Institute in Monterey. The Mountain Warfare Training Center is at Bridgeport, on the California-Nevada line, near Reno.

WASHINGTON: Marine Aviation Training Support Group 53 has a presence on Whidbey Island, near Seattle.

ARIZONA: The Marines have an Air Station at Yuma and another Marine Corps Detachment at Huachuca City.

OKLAHOMA: A Marine Corps Detachment is based at Fort Sill.

TEXAS: There are Marine Corps Detachments at Fort Bliss in El Paso, and at Goodfellow Air Force Base in San Angelo. Aviation Training Support Group 22 is situated at Corpus Christi. The Marines also have a reserve Detachment at Fort Worth.

LOUISIANA: The Marine Reserve HQ is in New Orleans.

MISSOURI: The Marine Mobilization Command is in Kansas City. Another Marine Corps Detachment is at Ft Leonard Wood.

INDIANA: The Marine Reserve Center is based in Indianapolis.

KENTUCKY: Another Marine Corps Detachment is stationed at Fort Knox in Louisville.

ALABAMA: There is also a Marine Corps Detachment at the Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville.

RHODE ISLAND: The Navy War College at Newport houses another Marine Corps Detachment.

MARYLAND: Marine Aviation Detachments are located at Patuxent River, Fort Meade, and at the Aberdeen Proving Ground.

VIRGINIA: The important Quantico Marine Corps Base is in northern Virginia. The Marines also operate Henderson Hall, near the Pentagon, as well as a ceremonial Marine Barracks in DC. Marines are at the Camp Allen Naval Station at Norfolk. At nearby Virginia Beach, Aviation Training Support Group 33 is operated. A Marine Corps Detachment is also based at Fort Lee.

NORTH CAROLINA: In addition to the major base at Camp Lejeune in Jacksonville, NC, there are several redundant facilities there including: 1) Camp Geiger, 2) Camp Gilbert Johnson, 3) Courthouse Bay, and 4) Stone Bay. The New River Air Station is also in Jacksonville, NC. The nearby City of Havelock houses another redundant Cherry Point Air Station. The Marines practice carrier landings at the Bogue Landing Field. They have yet another training area at Camp Davis.

SOUTH CAROLINA: An enlistee training base, Parris Island Marine Recruit Depot, is in Port Royal. The Marines also have an Air Station at Beaufort.

GEORGIA: The Marine Corps Logistics Base-Albany is in the southwest part of the state. Additional Marine Corps Detachments are located in Augusta, and at Fort Benning, in Columbus.

FLORIDA: Jacksonville, Florida is the home of the Blount Island Command. Pensacola houses a Marine Corps Detachment at Corry Station, as well as Aviation Training Support Group 21.

Why do we maintain such a large military? No foreign state is ever going to invade us, as it would be virtually impossible to maintain a foothold. Let’s get real and start closing some bases.

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11/15/2011

Peace Corps: Real Home of the Brave

We often see government TV ads promoting the Marines, as the place for strong men and women, but not often enough do we hear about the Peace Corps, that overlooked army of mentally tough young Americans, who physically survive each and every day in cultural settings totally foreign to the comforts of American life.

While the military is sometimes sent abroad to engage in armed combat, the Peace Corps is always overseas on the front lines in challenging foreign environments that present risks of the sort most Americans would not endure for very long, if at all.

Unlike the Armed Services, where individuals serve with Bands of Brothers, who vigilantly guard their backsides, Peace Corps volunteers go it alone, (think about that for a moment), and they go unarmed, in a world where they win over hearts and minds with nothing more than words and deeds.

The 8,655 volunteers of the Peace Corps, now living in 76 countries throughout Asia, Africa, Latin America, and elsewhere, are brave people, often assigned to villages where no one looks like them, or where no one speaks their language. Their single greatest hardship is the disconnection from the people back home.

But every day they also go without many conveniences we in the U.S. take for granted. A simple drink from the kitchen sink in the U.S. can for a volunteer require a trip to buy bottled water. A warm shower for most volunteers is a dream of something they once experienced back in the states, as water heaters are a luxury. If running water exists, poor pressure often reduces it to nothing more than a cold dribble. While they may have a toilet, toilet paper cannot be used as it only plugs up their outdated systems. The volunteers deal with these hardships, and a multitude of others. They adjust to conditions on the ground, and they survive.

If you ever thought service in the Peace Corps was a piece of cake, try it for a two-year hitch, or at least visit a volunteer, as I did these past 10 days in West Africa, where my son is serving. You will quickly realize how tough these young people are. All Americans should tip their hats to the Peace Corps volunteers, the finest group of unpaid Ambassadors the U.S. has ever had.